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Past REP News

2018-2019

 

2016-2017

 

2014-2015

 

2012-2013

2016-2017

IN THE NEWS

The Rochester Epidemiology Project has laid the foundation for hundreds of research studies to try and answer questions about health care issues that affect our community. Listed below are some of the news articles discussing the results of publications from 2016 and 2017 using REP data.


2017

The Rochester Epidemiology Project has laid the foundation for hundreds of research studies to try and answer questions about health care issues that affect our community. Listed below are some of the news articles discussing the results of publications from 2016 and 2017 using REP data.

December 2017


Time Trends in Parkinson Incidence
In recent years, investigators have learned much about the causes of Parkinson disease (PD), and greater efforts have been made to develop medications and treatments to manage PD.
Article: PHYSICIANSWEEKLY.COM

November 2017


Kidney Stones, Even Asymptomatic, Heighten Renal Risk
Risk for end-stage renal disease and all-cause mortality can be elevated in people who develop certain stones, according to a longitudinal cohort study presented here at Kidney Week 2017.
Article: MEDSCAPE.COM

October 2017


NAFLD Increases Risk for Cardiovascular Events in Women
Women with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are at equal risk for cardiovascular events as men with fatty liver disease, according to a large population-based study, suggesting NAFLD negates the cardiovascular protective effects of being female.
Article: MEDSCAPE.COM

Teaching an old REP new tricks—Rochester Epidemiology Project partnering with local Public Health
The Rochester Epidemiology Project (REP) has supported over 2,600 peer-reviewed scientific research publications covering a span of more than 50 years. Recent REP additions of the data exploration portal, adding Olmsted County Public Health data, and supporting public health community assessments are laying the foundation for even greater future success.
Article: ADVANCINGTHESCIENCE.MAYO.EDU

September 2017


Pre-amputation mobility increases likelihood of receiving prostheses
Transfemoral amputees who can walk independently prior to amputation are more likely to receive prostheses after amputation, according to data presented at the American Orthotic & Prosthetic Association World Congress.
Article: HEALIO.COM

August 2017


Mothers with history of pre-eclampsia may encounter cardiovascular challenges later in life
A new study has found that a condition that threatens the lives of some pregnant women and the fetus may continue to put the mother at risk later in life.
Article: NEWSNETWORK.MAYOCLINIC.ORG
Article: SCIENCEDAILY.COM
Article: SBS.COM.AU
Article: DOCTOR.NDTV.COM

No Increase in Stroke with Anti-VEGF Tx for Eye Disorders
Incidence of stroke did not increase among patients receiving anti-VEGF therapy compared with matched controls, researchers reported here.
Article: MEDPAGETODAY.COM
Article: MEDPAGETODAY.COM
Article: HEALIO.COM

Venous thromboembolic events persist despite in-hospital prophylaxis
Near-universal in-hospital prophylaxis did not lead to declines in hospital-related venous thromboembolic events, according to a study published in Blood.
Article: HEALIO.COM

July 2017


Study: Falls can be costly for amputees
The cost of falls for transfemoral amputees can be substantial. According to a Mayo Clinic study published in Prosthetics and Orthotics International, investigators found that in the 6-month period after a fall that resulted in hospitalization, the fall-related expenses for transfemoral amputees were similar to those reported for elderly populations.
Article: HEALIO.COM
Article: SCIENCEDAILY.COM

People with Parkinson’s should be monitored for melanoma, and vice versa, Mayo study finds
People with the movement disorder Parkinson’s disease have a much higher risk of the skin cancer melanoma, and vice versa, a Mayo Clinic study finds.
Article: NEWSNETWORK.MAYOCLINIC.ORG
Article: HEALIO.COM
Article: EUREKALERT.ORG
Article: LIFESCIENCEDAILY.COM
Article: PARKINSONSNEWSTODAY.COM
Article: MEDICALNEWSTODAY.COM

June 2017


High Incidence of Sarcoidosis Found in Ground Zero Firefighters and EMS Workers Post-9/11
A recent epidemiological study showed a high incidence of sarcoidosis among firefighters and emergency medical service (EMS) workers who took part in recovery and rescue efforts following the 9/11 terrorist attack on the World Trade Center (WTC) in New York that claimed the lives of almost 3,000 people.
Article: SARCOIDOSISNEWS.COM

Is Sjorgen Syndrome a Rare Disease?
According to the Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Sjogren’s syndrome is not a rare disease, but based on data presented at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2017), it can be argued otherwise.
Article: RAREDR.COM

Women with past adverse childhood experiences more likely to have ovaries removed, study shows
Mayo Clinic researchers report that women who suffered adverse childhood experiences or abuse as an adult are 62 percent more likely to have their ovaries removed before age 46. These removals are for reasons other than the presence of ovarian cancer or a high genetic risk of developing cancer, says the new study published today in BMJ Open.
Article: NEWSNETWORK.MAYOCLINIC.ORG
Article: MEDSCAPE.COM (free with site registration)
Article: MINNPOST.COM
Article: EUREKALERT.ORG

Rochester Epidemiology Project: Taking a bite out of poor health
“We are very pleased by the interest of dental providers in participating in the Rochester Epidemiology Project,” says Alan Carr, D.M.D., chair of Dental Specialties at Mayo Clinic, and the lead champion for the inclusion of dental records in the Rochester Epidemiology Project.
Article: ADVANCINGTHESCIENCE.MAYO.EDU

May 2017


Long-Term Opioids May Not Help in Polyneuropathy
—Patients had worse functional outcomes than controls; some became dependent

Long-term opioid therapy in patients with polyneuropathy appears to increase the risk of adverse outcomes without benefiting functional status, researchers said.
Article: MEDPAGETODAY.COM
Article: JOURNALS.LWW.COM

Dentists in good compliance with American Heart Association guidelines, according to Rochester Epidemiology Project
In the first study examining dental records in the Rochester Epidemiology Project, results show that dentists and oral surgeons are in good compliance with guidelines issued by the American Heart Association (AHA) in 2007, describing prophylactic antibiotic use prior to invasive dental procedures.
Article: NEWSNETWORK.MAYOCLINIC.ORG
Article: MEDICALXPRESS.COM
Article: ECONOMICTIMES.INDIATIMES.COM

A new resource that could change community and public health: Rochester Epidemiology Project’s Data Exploration Portal
After celebrating its 50th anniversary in May 2016, the Rochester Epidemiology Project team is not stopping to rest. Instead, they are marking the beginning of the next 50 years with the launch of a tool that could change community and public health in the region.
Article: NEWSNETWORK.MAYOCLINIC.ORG
Article: EPIMONITOR.NET

Higher incidence of Bell’s palsy attributed to increase in herpes zoster infection
A higher incidence of Bell’s palsy in recent years may be attributed to increasing rates of herpes zoster infection, according to research presented at the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology annual meeting.
Article: HEALIO.COM

Study offers answers on life expectancy for people with Parkinson’s disease, Lewy body dementia
Faced with a serious disease, patients want to know the answer to a difficult question: “How long will I live?” A new Mayo Clinic study in today’s JAMA Neurology has some answers for patients with Parkinson’s disease, Lewy body dementia, multiple system atrophy with parkinsonism and Parkinson’s disease dementia.
Article: NEWSNETWORK.MAYOCLINIC.ORG
Article: HEALTH.USNEWS.COM
Article: JOURNALS.LWW.COM
Article: NEUROLOGYADVISOR.COM

Skin cancer on the rise
New diagnoses for two types of skin cancer increased in recent years, according to a Mayo Clinic-led team of researchers.
Article: NEWSNETWORK.MAYOCLINIC.ORG
Article: NYMAG.COM
Article: WINONADAILYNEW.COM
Article: DAILYSTAR.CO.UK
Article: SPECIALTYPHARMACYTIMES.COM
Article: THEDERRICK.COM

SHAC takes aim at troubling Somali health trends
Nasra Giama and Abdirashid Shire created the Somali Health Advisory Council in Rochester about seven years ago. It’s now playing a critical role in the state’s ongoing effort to educate Minnesota-based Somali Americans about the importance of vaccinations.
Article: POSTBULLETIN.COM

April 2017


New Mayo Study: 30% of THA Patients Will Need 2nd THA
“So if I have this hip replaced, what are the chances I will need the other hip done later on?” That is one of the questions that a team of Mayo Clinic researchers wanted to answer.
Article: RYORTHO.COM

Treatments other than surgery may influence risk for breast cancer–related lymphedema
Rates of lymphedema in patients with breast cancer were higher among those who received chemotherapy, radiation and axillary dissection, according to study data presented at the American Society of Breast Surgeons Annual Meeting.
Article: HEALIO.COM

March 2017


Heart failure and skilled nursing facilities: The importance of getting the facts
For many people diagnosed with heart failure—which almost invariably results in a hospital stay—the next stop is a skilled nursing facility.
Article: MEDICALXPRESS.COM

Ep. 33 #Improving Health Globally By Studying #Health Locally
The Rochester Epidemiology Project (REP) is a collaboration of clinics, hospitals, and other medical facilities in Minnesota and Wisconsin and involves community members who have agreed to share their medical records for research.
Podcast: SOUNDCLOUD.COM

Meet the Researcher: “Rochester Epidemiology Project (REP)”
Walter A. Rocca, M.D., professor of epidemiology and neurology, shares how the Rochester Epidemiology Project (REP), through collaboration between health care providers in Minnesota and Wisconsin, allows researchers to study health and illness on people living in this community.
Video: YOUTUBE.COM

Shedding More Light on Sarcoidosis
Our immune system is designed to repel disease, but occasionally it malfunctions. One potential result of an immune system overreaction is sarcoidosis — the growth of inflammatory cells (granulomas) in different parts of the body.
Article: DISCOVERYSEDGE.MAYO.EDU

Choosing Wisely—At odds with Diagnostic Accuracy?
Using data from the Rochester Epidemiology Project, Mayo Clinic researchers performed the first population based study in the United States of primary Sjögren’s syndrome to look at the prevalence of Sjögren’s syndrome in Olmsted County, Minnesota.
Article: ADVANCINGTHESCIENCE.MAYO.EDU

February 2017


Inflammatory bowel disease diagnoses rising
Mayo Clinic researchers report that cases of Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis – the main conditions that comprise inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) – are on the rise.
Article: DISCOVERYSEDGE.MAYO.EDU


2016

December 2016


High school football players, 1956-1970, did not have increase of neurodegenerative diseases
A recent study found that varsity football players from 1956 to 1970 did not have an increased risk of degenerative brain diseases compared with athletes in other varsity sports.
Article: Mayo Clinic News Network
Article: Crying Foul – PostBulletin

November 2016


Comparing gait parameters can predict decline in memory and thinking
Walking is a milestone in development for toddlers, but it’s actually only one part of the complex cognitive task known as gait that includes everything from a person’s stride length to the accompanying swing of each arm. A Mayo Clinic study recently published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease found that problems associated with gait can predict a significant decline in memory and thinking.
Article: Mayo Clinic News Network

Kidney Function After the First Kidney Stone Event
Kidney stones are an increasingly prevalent peril afflicting 7.2% to 7.7% of the adult population.
Article: Mayo Clinic Proceedings

October 2016


Low Vitamin D Increases Mortality Risk
A comprehensive population-based study finds that low levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D is linked with all-cause death.
Article: WorldHealth

September 2016


Most premenopausal women should not undergo oophorectomy due to risks for chronic health conditions
Premenopausal women who underwent bilateral oophorectomy demonstrated elevated risk for multiple chronic health conditions, according to results from a historical cohort study.
Article: Healio

Rochester Epidemiology Project celebrates 50 years
Local health leaders gathered Monday at Mayo Clinic to celebrate 50 years of the groundbreaking Rochester Epidemiology Project, while also announcing a new outreach program over the next year.
Article: Post Bulletin
Article: StarTribune

August 2016


Project expands reach to help improve medical care
Regional program combines medical information from hundreds of thousands with goal of improving health care, advancing research
Article: Leader-Telegram

Does Giant Cell Arteritis Increase Risk of Venous Thromboembolism?
Patients with giant cell arteritis (GCA) are not at increased risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE), stroke, or transient ischemic attack (TIA) compared with those without GCA, data published in PLoS ONE indicate.
Article: Neurology Advisor

New Suicide Prevention Opportunities Identified
The attempted suicide is the strongest known predictor of completed suicide, and a history of a suicide attempt may indicate suicide risk over the entire adult lifetime. The risk for a completed suicide following an earlier attempt, however, is much higher than previously thought, according to new findings published in The American Journal of Psychiatry.
Article: Psychiatry Advisor
Local News Coverage

Cancer risk higher with heart failure in MI survivors
Patients who developed heart failure (HF) after their first myocardial infarction (MI) were more likely to receive a cancer diagnosis when compared with patients who did not develop HF following their first MI incident, a study suggests.
Article: Medpage Today

No link found between aneurysm size and dissection in patients with giant cell arteritis
Results from this study indicated aneurysm size did not predict aortic dissection or rupture in patients with giant cell arteritis and that active inflammation may be a factor in the higher frequency of active aortitis in patients with dissection.
Article: Healio

June 2016


Study: Increase in Parkinson’s disease over 30 years
The dramatic results of the Mayo Clinic study have some researchers surprised
Article: KIMT.COM
Article: NeurologyNow
Article: YouTube Spanish Interview

April 2016

Aspirin May Be A Potential Bile Duct Cancer Treatment
As a drug, aspirin has many uses. Now, researchers are saying aspirin has potential as treatment for bile duct cancer, a rare type of the disease
Article: TECHTIMES.COM | BY TECH TIMES

CV Risks Up in Cutaneous Lupus
Chance of cerebrovascular events three times higher versus controls
Article: MEDPAGETODAY.COM

CAD Extent May Foreshadow Risk of Heart Failure After First MI – Daily News – TCTMD
The number of occluded coronary arteries at the time of first MI may predict whether patients will subsequently develop heart failure (HF), a large population-based study suggests. The findings underscore the importance of understanding how HF emerges over time once an MI has occurred, the researche…
Article: TCTMD.COM

February 2016

Childhood ADHD in Girls Linked to Later Obesity
Association was statistically significant for girls but not boys
Article: MEDPAGETODAY.COM

Weight Loss Between Mid-Life and Late Life May Signal MCI
New findings suggest that an increasing rate of weight loss from mid-life to late life may help identify persons at risk for mild cognitive impairment.
Article: MEDSCAPE.COM

Study Finds No Link Between Surgical Anesthesia and MCI
ROCHESTER, Minn. – A Mayo Clinic study of people who received anesthesia for surgery after age 40 found no association […] Article: NEWSNETWORK.MAYOCLINIC.ORG

January 2016

US Thiazide-Associated Hypercalcemia Rates Peaked in 2006, Then Declined
The incidence of thiazide-associated hypercalcemia began to increase in 1998, reached a peak in 2006 and decreased after that time, according to recent findings. Robert A. Wermers, MD, of the Mayo Clinic, and colleagues evaluated 221 residents of Olmsted County, Minnesota, with thiazide-associated h…
Article: HEALIO.COM

Shingles Risk 70% Higher for Adults With Asthma
Researchers suggest considering zoster vaccine for those aged 50 years and older with asthma. Their findings build on their previous work showing a link between childhood asthma and shingles
Article: MEDSCAPE.COM

Study: Not All axSpA Progresses to Ankylosing Spondylitis
Axial spondyloarthritis may be a prolonged prodromal state, authors say
Article:MEDPAGETODAY.COM

Find More Publications

To find more publications of research studies supported by the Rochester Epidemiology Project, visit our Publications Search page. On this page, you can search hundreds of publications supported by the REP and related to almost every disease imaginable.